Facebook, Twitter face U.S. Congress over politics and the internet

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Executives from Facebook and Twitter are testifying before Congress on Wednesday in their latest attempt to assure lawmakers that they are capable of protecting the upcoming midterm elections from foreign interference - but the loudest message may have come from Google, which was represented by an empty chair.

Sheryl Sandberg will tell the Senate Intelligence Committee on Wednesday that Facebook was "too slow to spot" Russian interference in the 2016 USA presidential election and "too slow to act", according to an opening statement the Facebook chief operating officer released Tuesday. Still, their business models - free services that rely on attracting as many users as possible for as long as possible and finding out as much about them as possible - remain the same. "The actions we've taken in response - beginning with the steps Facebook's General Counsel, Colin Stretch, outlined to this Committee previous year - show our determination to do everything we can to stop this kind of interference from happening".

Sandberg will apologise for Facebook's response to Russian interference during the 2016 U.S. presidential election: "We were too slow to spot this and too slow to act".

"The companies have made progress, the government has made progress, but the bad guys have made progress as well", said Sen. "I'm not even sure it's trending in the right direction", he added.

The leaders defended their practices of censorship and sharing personal data with third parties as lawmakers called for greater federal regulations to ensure the United States does not repeat the mistakes of the 2016 presidential election, where Russian Federation played a key role in infiltrating these social media sites.

"We were too slow to spot this and too slow to act", Sandberg said during the Senate hearing, addressing Russian attempts to interfere in the 2016 USA presidential election.

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Expressing his views on Twitter, he wrote, " Petrol , diesel and gas prices are rising and are hitting all-time highs daily. According to South African Petroleum Industry Association, the petrol retail price is regulated by the government.

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I left him space, but it was me who was the one who spun around. "We got more points than Ferrari in their home". And then you get back up and you start from the back and you have to come through.

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Lastly, on the software side, it looks like Apple has done some work on the watch face , adding a lot more complexity to it. Units affected by these defective boards will see "unexpected restarts, a frozen screen, or won't turn on", says Apple.

"Twitter does not use political ideology to make any decisions, whether related to ranking content on our service or how we enforce our rules", Dorsey said in prepared remarks to a congressional hearing with United States technology giants. Twitter denies that's happening.

Dorsey meanwhile says Twitter has continued to identify accounts that may be linked to the same Russian internet agency in Mueller's indictment. He said it suspended 770 account for violating Twitter policies. Jones made an angry appearance outside the hearing room, telling reporters that he was there to "face my accusers".

Representative David Cicilline, a Democrat, blasted the hearing and Republicans, saying there is no evidence that the algorithms of social networks or search results are biased against conservatives.

"Twitter does not use political ideology to make any decisions, whether related to ranking content on our service or how we enforce our rules", Dorsey said in prepared testimony obtained by Fox News.

The testimony comes as some Republicans say conservatives have been censored on social media. Google and other tech companies have denied any political bias.

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