Brett Kavanaugh confirmation vote: Senators at each other's throats

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Republicans and Democrats are fighting back and forth in the Senate over the Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation.

Separately, Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, told reporters, "The president's comments were just plain wrong".

Jeff Flake of Arizona to strike a deal to avoid holding a confirmation vote until after an FBI investigation into allegations of sexual misconduct against Kavanaugh, said on Tuesday that he was "concerned" about damage to key bipartisan relationships.

Blumenthal told Wolf Blitzer on CNN's "The Situation Room" that "The clarification of that tweet would require me to go into the FBI report, but what that tweet highlights very dramatically and directly is the need for a full investigation, and for the public to know what's in that investigation, which is why it should be made public and why the facts here are really so important". 'I don't know.' What neighborhood was it? "I never saw Brett black out or not be able to remember the prior evening's events, nor did I ever see Brett act aggressive, hostile or in a sexually aggressive manner to women", wrote one of them, Dan Murphy, a former suitemate of Kavanaugh. I don't remember. Where is the place? Lindsey Graham, Republican of SC, said of Trump's Tuesday night tirade. "I just say it's kind of appalling", Mr Flake said.

Sen. Bob Corker speaks to members of the media after a weekly Senate Republican Policy Luncheon at the Capitol on May 8, 2018, in Washington.

I don't even know him. "Wholly inappropriate and entirely unacceptable" chimed in Murkowski.

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh testifies during the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The lack of interviews raises "serious concerns that this is not a credible investigation and begs the question: what other restrictions has the White House placed on the FBI?"

On Trump's performance in MS, she said, "I'd prefer that we all have some grace here". Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Republican-Kentucky) has said the chamber will vote on Kavanaugh later this week, and the conservative jurist's fate is in the hands of a handful of undecided GOP and Democratic senators.

Republicans now hold a 51-49 advantage in the Senate.

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New York Senator Chuck Schumer, a Democrat, has been critical of Kavanaugh all week as well, calling for an FBI investigation. She's accused Kavanaugh and Judge of "abusive" behavior toward women and of being present at a party where she was raped.

Besides Flake and Collins, Republican Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Democrats Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota have yet to declare their positions on Kavanaugh.

So far, no Republicans have said they would vote against Kavanaugh.

Opposition among Americans to Kavanaugh has increased since last week's hearing, Reuters/Ipsos polling data showed on Wednesday.

But last week he took the gloves off, ripping into Democrats for what he called "a calculated and orchestrated political hit, fuelled with apparent pent-up anger about President Trump and the 2016 election" and "revenge on behalf of the Clintons." Sen.

Trump spent much of the rally, however, lamenting the treatment of Kavanaugh by Democrats, whose attacks, he said, had taken their toll on the judge's family.

At a White House briefing, Trump's spokeswoman Sarah Sanders defended his remarks in MS and said he was not concerned the comments may have jeopardized the votes of key senators.

But Sanders argued that Trump was simply pointing out gaps in Ford's testimony that had also been noted by sex crimes prosecutor Rachel Mitchell, who was hired by Republican senators to question her during the hearing.

In a separate statement on Twitter, John Clune, who represents another accuser, Deborah Ramirez, said Federal Bureau of Investigation agents interviewed her on Sunday and accepted a list of more than 20 witnesses who can support her allegations.

He also lamented the cost of Ford's allegations to Kavanaugh and insinuated that she was part of a conspiracy by the Democrats to discredit him.

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